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From Easter Eggs to Deviled Eggs

From Easter Eggs to Deviled Eggs

I eat a lot of deviled eggs during the spring — especially around Easter. This all started with a few cracked eggs that just didn’t look right after I dyed them. The colors missed the thin white lines, and my eggs looked like they had stretch marks. Don’t get me wrong: stretch marks are a beautiful part of the human body. But on an Easter egg? It’s just wrong. Thankfully, it’s easy to turn Easter eggs to deviled eggs, which are delicious!

Text by Sarah Vice

Hands are holding a plastic bowl filled with have peeled boiled eggs over a sink.

Preparations

Once my friends and I have divvied up the eggs to dye, we set up the dipping cups. We buy generic egg-dying kits with those little tablets that dissolve in vinegar. Sometimes, the water’s a different color than the tablet, once they dissolve.

Eggs Lifehack

The most challenging part of making deviled eggs? Removing the shell. Learning how to use cracked Easter eggs is a life-saving lifehack. Their shells are already broken. If I’m honest, when I’m getting the dye ready, sometimes I hope that more eggs will be broken than not. I wouldn’t admit this to my friends, but when we dye eggs together, I’m not super careful when removing them from the pot. Yes, that’s partly because I’m impatient. But it’s also partly because I want some to be cracked.

several hands painting boiled eggs on a wooden table.

To Dye or To Eat

I always claim the broken eggs so my friends can dye as many smooth-shelled eggs as they want. While the others finish up their eggs, I don’t hesitate to get out the mayonnaise, dill relish, and sweet relish. This is a personal recipe, because for the longest time I didn’t know deviled eggs involved mustard and paprika. But I like my version, so I’ve stuck to it. If you’re interested in branching out, check out these 20 variations on the traditional recipe. From blue crab to Sriracha, exciting ingredients make for heavenly deviled eggs. You can even make them in an instant pot!

Painted Easter eggs sitting on the ground in front of a tree.

Not for the Hunt

I don’t even attempt to put the yolk mix back into the boiled whites when I’m done. I never liked that part to begin with, so when I make my own, it’s just the yoke. By Easter Sunday, I’ve usually consumed more eggs than I’ve dyed. It’s all worth it, though. Besides, plastic eggs are better for decoration anyways. They don’t spoil when left out. Real eggs are meant to be cherished and eaten.