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Learning How to Cook Eggs with Mema

Learning How to Cook Eggs with Mema

My Mema was a hard-working grandmother with very little time on her hands. But that didn’t stop her from teaching me important life skills. From Mema, I learned how to bargain shop. I learned which fruits were ripe for picking and how to part my hair. Most importantly, I learned how to cook eggs — and, along with that, I learned the importance of patience and persistence.

Text by Sarah Vice

A child's feet are next to a mess of spilled eggs on tile flooring.

A Mess of Eggs

I was six years old the first time I attempted to make eggs. Mema set out two bowls and a carton of eggs on the kitchen counter. Then, she handed me an egg and let me watch her crack one on the edge of her bowl. I tried to mimic her movements, but ended up with half the egg on my shoes and the other half in the bowl — shell included.

I impatiently pulled her bowl down to see what her eggs looked like on the inside, and ended up spilling more egg on my shoes. She just laughed. She had the most memorable wheezing laugh I had ever heard. Later, I realized with delight that she and I shared the same laugh.

An older woman's hands are cracking an egg over a green bowl.

Don’t Give Up

Mema helped me clean up my mess and took the remaining eggs over to a skillet on the stove. Glass top ovens weren’t common yet, so the skillet sat on a black cage with a blue flame underneath. The flame hissed and clicked, reminding me not to get too close without permission.

Mema whisked the eggs together in one bowl before pouring them into the heavily buttered skillet. Her hands moved so quickly that I was convinced I’d never be as good as her.  She said someday, with practice, I would be just as fast. It reminded me of my lack of patience, a trait she assured me came from my grandad. But really it came from her.

A skillet with scrambled eggs, a clean whisk, and broken eggs shells are sitting on a table.

Cooking and Life Require Patience

She pulled up a chair near the stove for me to reach the skillet. I watched her move a spatula back and forth through the eggs. This broke them up and scrambled them. She handed the spatula to me, then added more butter and some salt. A few times, the yokes spilled over onto the eye, but Mema never took the spatula away from me.

I ended up making half-burnt (but still somehow delicious) eggs that we shared. After that, she let me help her make eggs very morning that I stayed with her. She never got upset with me, no matter how many messes I made or how long it took to finish cooking. Memories of making eggs with her remind me that sometimes love is shown through expressions of kindness and patience. And I also can cook a mean scrambled egg to this day, thanks to Mema.

Community Nourishment: Comfort Food

Community Nourishment: Comfort Food

When you’re in need of comfort, there’s nothing better than delicious Southern soul food. And sometimes we need comfort from life-altering events like natural disasters. For my town, April 27, 2011 was one of those times.

Text by Sarah Vice

Recovering

Most Alabamians know by now what happened on that date. A large EF4 tornado ripped through half of Alabama. But what you may not know is how the communities pulled together directly after the storm. A neighborhood beside my high school was flattened, but thankfully no lives were lost there. In the days after the tragedy, I witnessed how people show love through food, and how a meal can heal in the most necessary of ways.

The National Guard had brought in aluminum bags of prepared foods. Residents also donated all the canned goods they could offer. These weren’t exactly the kinds of comfort foods that we look forward to, but no one was complaining.

A hand is passing a paper bowl of soup to another person's hand.

Volunteer Servers and Chefs

Within a few days, however, the local restaurants that remained unaffected were able to pull together enough volunteer employees to reopen. But they weren’t just reopening for business. They were reopening to provide meals to those who needed them the most.

These restaurant owners were members of this town. They lived with the people affected by the tornado and were set on doing as much as they could to help. The employees and owners worked hard making hamburgers, biscuits, BBQ sandwiches, key lime pies, tacos, and so much more. They piled the food into trucks to drive to a community center. There, they welcomed all to a warm, free meal.

Four women posing together outside in front of a table that is for a bake sale.

Community Cooks

People were visibly in tears. They ate hungrily. For many, it was the first full, hot meal they’d had in almost a week. But the restaurants didn’t stop at serving these delicious dishes. They also opened up fundraisers in unaffected nearby towns in hopes of bringing more supplies to the victims.

Neighbors who still had a home joined in. They baked several meals a day and brought the food to the community center. For weeks to come, their food, kindness, and generosity nourished my small town. It’s in these moments that we grow to appreciate the little things like comfort foods and the bigger things, like our communities, that become our support systems.

Partner Profile: Marble Creek Farmstead

Partner Profile: Marble Creek Farmstead

There’s no such thing as being too careful when it comes to choosing what goes on your plate and into your mouth. Market Table picks the best local Alabama produce and foods so that you don’t have to second guess your food choices. We’re proud to have Marble Creek Farmstead on our distributors’ list. Get to know them here.

Text by Sarah Vice

Baby chick in woman's hand.

Who Is Marble Creek Farmstead?

Named for its location, Marble Creek Farmstead is an all-natural farm located in the Marble City (Sylacauga, Alabama). It began as a a large patch of land, an old farmhouse, and a determined newlywed couple. After successfully raising broiler chickens for a year, that newlywed couple, Jesie and Matthew Lawrence, began investing time in growing crops and raising other farm animals. Marble Creek quickly became something much larger. They now employ a few extra hands and spend time regularly tending to vegetation and to hundreds of animals on the property. They’re careful to follow scientific strategies to maintain the health of their land, livestock, and well-being.

What Does It Mean to Be All-Natural?

The Lawrences believe that “eating truly healthy food benefits us all.” That’s why they refrain from using harsh chemicals and pesticides on their property. To remove the GMO obstacles, they regularly change the routine of their farms. The chickens are moved from location to location, fertilizing the pastures naturally. They also rotate other animals to prevent them from eating too much of the grass in one location. This benefits the soil’s productivity by allowing time for it to recover.

Four chickens on farm at sunset.

What Do They Farm?

Currently, Marble Creek hosts broiler chickens, hogs, roosters, duck, geese, goats, (occasionally) cows, and a series of fruits and vegetables. Their most popular items are their chicken and duck eggs, which have a fridge life of up to 45 days. In fact, Marble Creek supplies Market Table’s eggs, and we can attest that they’re absolutely delicious. Also, they now have a facility where they can butcher meat and preserve it to sell.

What Is Marble Creek Farmstead’s Mission?

The Lawrence family hopes to continue farming for their table’s needs and to share their produce with the neighboring communities. Farm tours are available so that people can enjoy the beautiful scenery and see how they maintain the farm. This allows customers an up-close look at how their food comes to be. It also invites a healthier community atmosphere and provides natural food alternatives to store-bought preservatives.

Living with a Roommate Who Can’t Cook

Living with a Roommate Who Can’t Cook


In my time at college I’ve gotten comfortable with cooking. But, that’s not the case for everyone — especially my roommates.

Text by Annika Bastian

My first roommate tried to pan fry two frozen chicken breasts. My next roomie set off the fire alarm with a breakfast quesadilla. For those of you who can’t cook, here are some ways to make your roommates think you can. And for those of you who are living with a roommate who can’t cook, here’s some tips to keep you apartment’s safety deposit.

Woman holds flaming pan.

Breakfast For Dinner

I love breakfast for dinner. My roommate can make practice pancakes until she has at least a few light, fluffy beauties. She cooks bacon and sausage in the microwave. And she can even make a mean scrambled egg (on low heat). It’s a comfort food for both of us that’s very beginner-cook friendly. Add a sprig of parsley for garnish and you’ve got a gourmet meal.

Soup and Sandwiches

My roommate gets a text from her mother every time soup goes on sale at Publix. Then she rushes to the store and loads up her cart so we always have a quick dinner option. She heats soup on the stove, but soup can also heat in the microwave. Just make sure it’s in a bowl and not its metal can! We’re also big fans of Market Table soups, made with fresh, local ingredients. Grilled cheese sandwiches are tasty stovetop options, and for fledgling chefs unsure of the stove, ham and cheese sandwiches are equally delicious.

Close-up of grilled cheese and bowl of tomato soup.

Crock-Pot Experiments

My roommate excels at Crock Pot dinners. One of our favorites is loaded BBQ Baked Potatoes. She combines BBQ sauce and thawed ground turkey in our Crock Pot. Then, she can leave it on low until she needs to bake the potatoes, which she can do in the microwave.

Another go-to recipe for her is meatballs and gravy. She makes an easy base sauce with cream of mushroom soup, milk, and a spoonful of sour cream. After she adds premade frozen meatballs, it can cook until it’s time to serve. Additionally, the possible seasonings on this dish are very forgiving. She gives this dish a shake of garlic, onion, and pepper.

We love using Crock Pot liners to cut down on the mess and make cleaning up easier.

Slow cooker on kitchen counter,

Still worried about starting a fire when you turn on the stove? Head to Market Table for our delicious, healthy, fully prepared meals, sandwiches, salads and catering options. You can even pretend you made them yourself — we promise we won’t tell.

Fall 2018 Flavor Trends

Fall 2018 Flavor Trends

Fall’s almost here! And that means one thing: Pumpkin Spice. But, of course, pumpkin spice isn’t the only flavor coming back this fall. We’ve compiled a list of fall 2018 flavor trends sure to line the shelves this season.

Sweet: Maple

Maple flavoring appeared in some fall beverages and sweets over the last few years. However, we expect the flavor to reach a new peak this season. While maple will continue to sweeten warm drinks, we also expect it to pair with adult beverages like bourbon and whiskey. The richness of the maple pulls out the deep flavors gained from the barrels during the distilling process. Additionally, the sweetness of maple softens the bite of the alcohol, making it an ideal addition to fall and winter cocktails.

Maple Fall Flavor Trends.

Savory: Brown Butter

Brown butter brings a savory twist to any dish that calls for butter. Simply heat regular butter just past its melting point. This turns the butter a brown, toasted color. Additionally, the heating process releases a nutty flavor you won’t get from regular butter. Brown butter pairs especially well with dishes already containing pecans and hazelnuts, like various breads or baked goods.

Fall Flavor Trends Brown Butter.

Fruity: Orange

We expect to see a rise in the use of the orange’s flavor this fall. Orange can be used in so many different ways. This makes it a very versatile flavor, with uses from baked goods to beverages to savory pasta dishes. Orange pairs especially well with cinnamon and other spices making it a great addition to spicy dishes that will keep you warm this fall. Finally, orange will be an increasingly popular flavor for fall beers, cocktails and teas.

Orange Fall Flavor Trends.

There’s no doubt that Pumpkin Spice’s reign will continue. Still, keep an eye out for these fall flavors this season. Don’t be afraid to get creative and add them to your own dishes!

Text by Amy Haupt

The Food Bowl Trend

The Food Bowl Trend

Woman Instagramming a Smoothie Bowl

If you’re still eating your food off of a plate, it’s time to get with the hottest new trend: bowls. Need further proof? Go search #bowl on Instagram, and you’ll see over two million pictures of food bowls. Even at the royal wedding of Prince Harry and Megan Markel, reception guests ate various options of the food bowl. Though you probably won’t be dining with the Queen of England, you’re still going to want to get in the bowl game. Here’s why these aesthetically pleasing dishes are on the rise.

 

They’re Healthy

Blue spirulina smoothie bowl with fruitFood bowls may look too beautiful to eat, but they are definitely good for your health. This is why the trend is so popular amongst healthy eaters. You’re getting all your grains, proteins, and vegetables right in one main dish, and the heartiness of the meal will leave you full for hours.

This bowl trend also means there’s more healthy food options. Restaurants are competing to “out bowl” each other. More restaurants offer healthy bowl options, which is a win for you. Instead of driving across town for your food bowl, you’ll probably find a nearby restaurant that’s caught on to the new trend.

 

They’re Easy to Make

If you’re trying to save some money, food bowls are also simple to make. Another great thing about food bowls is that they’re infinitely customizable. You can mix and match bases, toppings, and dressings to your heart’s desire. This make food bowls great for meal preppers, lunch lovers, and picky eaters.

 

Poke bowl with avocado and seaweedThey’re Multicultural

If you’re skeptical about joining the craze, just know that this is no fad. In fact, food bowls have been around for a long time. They get their origins from Hawaiian and Brazilian culture with the poke and açaí bowls, respectively.

Poke is a staple Hawaiian dish and traditionally includes raw cubed tuna. But, there are other options such as octopus, salmon or tofu. All of this is served on a bed of rice and topped with furikake, a Japanese seasoning equivalent to America’s salt and pepper. This dish has left the island and established itself as a popular food bowl throughout the rest of the country.

Acai bowl with nuts and berriesAçaí is a superfruit with lots of health benefits. It gained its popularity through smoothie bowls, but it’s also a popular icecream flavor. Açaí bowls, or Açaí na tigela in Brazil, are fruit smoothie bowls topped with granola, bananas, other berries and syrups. These are the bowls you’ll see the most on Instagram.

 

If stepping up your Instagram game or the Royal family wasn’t enough motivation to join the food bowl movement, then maybe these benefits and cool origins will inspire you to join soon.

 

Text by Kendal Harris