Weekly Prepared Meals

Fully Prepared Meals

The Easiest Way To Put A Healthy Dinner On The Table!


Each Meal Serves 2

Taco Turkey Bowls   $16.50
Gluten Free, Whole30, Paleo, Keto, Dairy Free, Low Carb
256 Calories per Serving

Tomato and Spinach Pasta   $16.50
Vegetarian
359 Calories per Serving               

Skinny General Tso’s Chicken   $18.50
Gluten Free, Dairy Free
278 Calories per Serving

Shrimp Cakes with Summer Corn Salad & Asparagus   $19.50
Gluten Free
468 Calories

Beef & Broccoli    $18.50
Gluten Free, Whole30, Paleo
248 Calories

Honey Balsamic Pork Tenderloin with Garlic Mash & Grilled Zucchini    $19.00    

Light Chicken Piccata    $18.00
486 Calories

Sesame Chicken Salad    $18.00
Gluten Free, Whole30, Paleo
392 Calories

Garlic Shrimp & Cilantro over Brown Rice    $18.50
Gluten Free
502 Calories


Freezer Meals

As Easy As Turning On The Oven!


Each Meal Serves 4, $18.99 each

Low Carb Chicken Enchilada Casserole
Low Carb, Kid Friendly
406 Calories per serving

Cheeseburger Bake
Gluten Free, Kid Friendly
261 Calories per Serving

Zucchini Lasagna
Gluten Free, Low Carb
275 Calories per Serving

Vegetarian Lasagna
Vegetarian
547 Calories per Serving

Garlic Spaghetti Squash Casserole
Paleo, Whole 30, Gluten Free, Dairy Free
424 Calories per Serving

Light Chicken Parmesan Casserole 
400 Calories per Serving

Light Chicken & Rice Casserole
542 Calories per Serving

Laurel Mills on WBRC Fox 6 News!

Laurel Mills on WBRC Fox 6 News!

National Cheese Day may technically be over, but the celebration is never finished at Market Table. That’s why we’re happy to give you another chance to catch our CEO Laurel Mills talking about the wonders of a cheese platter on WBRC Fox 6 News.

You’re going to have some serious cravings after watching, but thankfully, we’ve got your back. At Market Table, every day is National Cheese Day.

Market Table Cheese Plate and Charcuterie Tray

 

Is Breakfast Really the Most Important Meal of the Day?

Is Breakfast Really the Most Important Meal of the Day?

You’ve heard it everywhere: from your mother to your doctor to TV nutritionists, everyone says that breakfast is the most important meal we eat. But what is the truth behind the claim? Is breakfast really the most important meal of the day?

Our research responded with a resounding yes!

Warm Farro and Fruit Bowl

It’s Good for Your Health — and Your Metabolism

When we wake up, our blood sugar levels are usually low. Breakfast resupplies our bodies with the nutrients needed to level out our blood sugars. In addition, breakfast kick-starts our metabolism. This, in turn, burns more calories throughout the day than if you didn’t eat breakfast. Studies actually show that people who eat a big, protein and carb-heavy breakfast are less likely to snack unhealthily throughout the day. This limits unhealthy fat intake and leads to a maintainable, healthier weight. Here at Market Table, we love to kick-start long days with our Breakfast Plate, featuring eggs, bacon or sausage, multi-grain toast and a side of greens tossed in our sweet and savory Maple Vinaigrette.

 

Avocado Toast

Breakfast Gives Your Body the Nutrients It Needs

Breakfast provides a great opportunity to load up on hard-to-get vitamins and nutrients like dairy, grains, fruits and protein. Look for whole grain breads and cereals and low-fat milk and yogurt as a healthy way to make your daily intake goals. Peanut butter is another way to get protein in your breakfast meal. Making a fruit smoothie with low-fat yogurt and fruit is a great light option for a filling breakfast. Not interested in making your own breakfast? We don’t blame you. For a hearty yet healthy treat packed with whole grains and fresh fruits, try our Warm Farro and Fruit Bowl. We also offer a delicious line-up of breakfast sandwiches. From Brie and Berries to an Egg Scramble to everyone’s favorite, Avocado Toast, our sandwiches provide the perfect balance of protein and whole grain to start your day on the sunny-side up.

 

Happy child eating a balanced breakfastBreakfast Makes You Smarter (Sort Of)

Eating a good, balanced breakfast boosts the body’s energy levels. This provides a clearer head and a longer and more focused attention span. This is an especially important factor for children. Kids who skip breakfast are more likely to misbehave and lack focus in a school setting. They may be cranky or restless because their bodies have not replenished themselves for the day. Kids eating a balanced breakfast see increased test scores and better overall moods. Not to mention, without breakfast it is hard for kids to get all the nutrients they need to grow at a healthy rate. And, with our à la carte menu, kids can choose the breakfast foods they like best from Fresh Fruit Salad to Pimento Cheese Grits to Gravel Ridge Farms eggs made exactly their way.

Spinach Artichoke and Goat Cheese Frittata

Breakfast is a crucial meal because it impacts every part of our lives from the moment we wake up and even through our sleep. Having a balanced and healthy diet has been shown to improve your night’s rest. And practicing healthy eating habits start with eating breakfast. The morning time when we’ve just woken up is when our bodies are most needing nutrients to start the day. It is also when our bodies are most capable of processing and absorbing nutrients that will limit our appetite for the rest of the day.

Tomorrow morning, skip the donuts and reach for the whole grain cereal and fruits. Head to Market Table for a fresh-baked Frittata or Prosciutto and Goat Cheese Croissant. And, if you’re in a rush, at least grab a whole grain protein bar. It is crucial to feed your body something within the first hour of waking up so that you can be at your best for the rest of the day.

It’s true what they say: breakfast really is the most important meal of the day.

 

Text by Amy Haupt

Food in Focus: What Is Aioli?

Food in Focus: What Is Aioli?

You may find yourself reading through the lists of strange-sounding words on a restaurant’s menu. One word that might pop up? Aioli. You might’ve heard that it’s similar to mayonnaise. But what is it, really? Aioli can be made many ways, all equally delicious.

Aioli Isn’t Just Mayonnaise

People tend to describe aioli as mayonnaise, but that’s not entirely true. Both sauces do contain similar ingredients: eggs, oil, and lemon juice. The difference lies in the way each sauce is made. First, mayonnaise is usually emulsified within a blender or food processor. Aioli, however, is traditionally made with pestle and mortar. When making aioli, chefs pound garlic into a paste. Then, they whisk the garlic paste along with egg yolks, lemon juice, and oil. The kind of oil makes a difference, too. While mayonnaise is made with canola oil, aioli is made with olive oil. The consistency of aioli can range from thick and paste-like to a creamy texture.

The History of Aioli

Aioli comes from the Mediterranean. Originally, aioli consisted of garlic salt ground into oil. In other regions, like France, cooks also added egg yolk and lemon juice. Current French aioli is closer to garlic mayonnaise than traditional aioli. The Spanish Catalan, however, don’t consider that true aioli. Instead, they only consider the eggless recipe to be aioli.

 

European Dishes That Include Aioli

Europeans traditionally serve aioli with fish or vegetables. The Spanish serve aioli with codfish and boiled vegetables like tomatoes, onions, and peppers. During the summer, they hold feasts where people bring their own fish and vegetables to dip into the host’s aioli. People in the Provence region of France celebrate a similar tradition. It’s called aioli monstre, or “grand aioli,” and it is, indeed, a grand celebration for foodies. Diners pile meats, fishes, and vegetables on their plate and then dip them in the aioli. Aioli is also a popular side dish during a French Christmas Eve dinner called the Gros Souper, or The Great Supper.

American Dishes That Include Aioli

In the United States, aioli is used as a catch-all term for flavored mayonnaise. This is especially true of garlic mayonnaise. In many fine dining restaurants, chefs use aioli on scallops and other seafood. Aioli can also be used as a spread on sandwiches in the US. Spanish food purists, however, would probably not consider this aioli. Still, the same basic ingredients ring true: cloves of garlic and canola oil.

You Can Make Your Own Version of Aioli

The main ingredient for today’s aioli? Creativity! Garlic and olive oil are the only constants in the recipe. You can add vegetables, like artichokes or beets. Or you can even add in meats, like fish or chicken. The best part is that aioli can be prepared well in advance of a meal. Wash and chop the ingredients, then put them in a food processor. And voila! You have a unique – and delicious! — dipping sauce for parties and other festivities. Serve up your aioli with steamed vegetables, meat, fish, or shellfish. A home-made aioli is a quick and easy way to add variety to left-overs, or create new and exciting flavor combinations along with prepared foods. For instance, this lemon-garlic aioli is delightful and delicious with Market Table’s pork tenderloin. Make orange peel aioli as a mouth-watering addition to Market Table’s smoked chicken. Finally, this savory jalapeño aioli adds just the right kind of spice to burgers and beef dishes, like our seared flank steak.

 

Text by Jonathon Page

The Whole Story About Whole30

The Whole Story About Whole30

You’ve probably seen posts about the Whole30 Diet circulating on social media. That’s because Whole30 encourages participants in the diet to share their stories. Not only does this keep them accountable, but it also helps them to find encouragement from fellow dieters. But what exactly is Whole30? And why is it all over your social media feeds?

 

Bowl of grilled chicken, asparagus, avocado, limeWhat Is Whole30?

This program revolves around 30 days of clean eating. The program promises that if you try clean eating for just 30 days, it’ll change your relationship with food. According to Whole30, certain foods negatively impact your mental and physical health. Some of these food include sugar, grains, dairy and legumes. So, rather than counting calories, you simply focus on eating foods that are good for your health.

 

What Can I Eat?

Tray of fresh root vegetables

There are pretty specific rules as to what you cannot eat. The number-one food group on the list is sugar, whether real or artificial — including substitutes like stevia and honey. The program also doesn’t allow for alcohol or tobacco. Grains, legumes, and dairy? Also not allowed. Don’t panic, though — that’s just for 30 days. If you feel stuck and unsure of what you can eat, Whole30 has a list of approved foods and brands, as well as their own meal plans.

 

What Are the Benefits?

This diet sounds a little extreme, but the program promises a vast variety of benefits. For one, it’s only 30 days to clean out your body and allow yourself to start fresh with a new mentality with food. After those 30 days, it’s not necessary to be as restrictive with your food choices, but you can keep the lessons learned from Whole30 in mind. Some of the benefits listed on Whole30’s website are weight loss, improvement to body composition, high energy levels, improved athletic performance, better sleep, improved focus andmental clarity, and a sunnier disposition.

 

Salad with chicken and tomatoes

If you’re struggling to get started on your Whole30 journey, you can try one of Market Table’s salads, Light Lunchboxes, or frittatas — just ask for it without cheese. We even have meal kits to help you cook healthy food at home. If you see anything else on the menu that looks good but doesn’t meet the Whole30 requirement, we can help you find a substitute.

Text by Katherine Polcari